Thursday, January 25, 2007

Damn...

Someone from our unit died last night. Motorcycle accident. I honestly don't even know what to say. Its not real to me. I don't (didn't?) know him as well as I wish I did either. But I knew him well enough to know that he was a really good guy. I don't know what else to think, its hard to wrap your mind around something like that. But I'm going to spare the cliches and internalize it for the most part. I checked in on a few guys from his platoon to see how they were doing, they seemed all right. Not really words for things like this though. Don't think I have much more to say about it either. He was a hell of a good guy, and he shouldn't be gone, but that's how it is I guess. I don't feel right talking about him in the past tense.

I had to open up our Stryker and lounge out in its spacious driver's compartment and wait for our commo guy to work on some of our equipment, an arduous task that's taken a few days already. Days where I sit there and accomplish nothing.

Its slightly cold outside, not as bad as it has been, and the big green monster only has a little bit of frost on it. I removed the tarp covering the exhaust vents and opened the hatch. Plopped down onto the seat like a little kid and started monkeying with the controls, to wake my big friend up. It roars its waking salutation and I command it to drop the ramp. It budges only an inch or so and stops. Something must be frozen....God I hope so.

I turn on the heater and recline the seat.
I forgot my fucking book....

I napped a little bit, and pretty soon it was time to go to our little psych evaluation. We take little surveys and get our blood pressure taken, we go from one waiting room to the next. I visited with a very nice and completely awesome (or rad, take your pic) young Asian woman. She was really funny, so I didn't mind BSing with her for a while. Since there was nothing really wrong with me, we talked about some things other soldiers experience.

She asked if my sleep patterns had changed at all recently. "Not that I've noticed."
She said that sometimes, soldiers will be more on edge, more alert, and their senses will heighten altogether when they're getting ready to deploy. The sleep lighter, they hear better, they may be less affectionate, and altogether more focused on the mission at hand.

She also mentioned that a lot of the time, soldiers remain fixated in that mode, even after returning, and it takes a little work to return them to their original baseline. Makes you think.

Who knows what time. Same BatChannel.

1 comment:

jentard said...

It's more surreal when people, especially young people, die in accidents, because you just don't expect it. That really sucks...

Is it different in the military when someone dies? I mean, in the 'civilian' world, people can talk about how they're feeling when something bad like that happens and no one really thinks anything of it, but in the military, is there some kind of stigma against that? Because you're training for war and death is considered an unfortunate fact of life? I guess I'm wondering if they expect you to just suck it up and deal with it or do they let you vent...